First
Editions

Search

What's New

Contents
Home

Site Map
Links
Value Guide
Copyright Info

Books
Printer

Shepherd
D.Matthews
Uncrowned
Barbara Worth

Yesterdays
Eyes of World
Man's a Man
Brian Kent
Helen
Mine
Son of Father
Groceryman
Long Ago Told
Exit
Devil's Hwy
Ma Cinderella
To My Sons
Went Away

Collectibles
Original Mat.
Excerpts
Plays
Pamphlets
--Compliments
--
As I know Him
--Intimate
--Life/Writings
--Inspired

--Sterling
Produce Labels

Sheet Music
BW  Hotel

ShepCountry
Other
Magazines

Photo Gallery
Paintings

Postcards
 
(List)
ADVERTISING
Appleton
BSC numbered
BSC no numb.

PRINTER

Aurora
SHEPHRD of HILLS
Area Photos
Boats, Docks
Branson RP
Branson tint
Hall Photo Co.
Marvel Cave
Matt's Cabn RP
Matt's Cabn tnt

Matt, Mollie, etc

Mutton,Dewey
Uncle Ike RP
Uncle Ike Tint
DAN MATTHEWS
Bennett Sp. Tint

Bennett Spr RP
Lebanon
BARB. WORTH
Hotel RP
Hotel Exterior
Hotel Inter

Hotel Scenic
Jacumba
San Diego

Santa Barbara

EYES

Forest Home
HBW PLACES
Hiram College
Imperial Cnty
Kansas City
Pierce City
Tucson


Movies
(Introduction)
1916, Eyes

1919, Shepherd
1924, Man
1924, Mine
1925, Son Father 
1925. Brian K
1926, Barb W
1928, Shepherd
(1928, Lights)
1930, Eyes
1935, When Man
1936,  Matthews
1936, The Mine
1936, Wild Brian
1937, West  Gold
1937, Out West
1937, Secret Vly
1937, Californian
1941, Shepherd
1949, Massacre
1959, Shep (TV)
1964, Shepherd

Locations
New York
Pierce City
Pittsburg
Kansas City
Lebanon
Branson
Redlands
El Centro
Tucson
Los Angeles
Escondido
San Diego

In Depth
Kinkead
Markham Review

Mike O'Brien
Tucson Library

UCLA Library

Princeton Library

Indiana U. Libr.

E Clampus Vitus
Bittersweet
Manuscripts

Sales

 


III.  Books Containing Excerpts From Wright  


The Four Brothers is 28 pages, including 12 full-page illustrations by Brummett Echohawk.  6" wide and 9" tall.  The book includes one chapter, pages 45-51, from Harold Bell Wright's book, Long Ago Told.
 
Illustrations ©1975 BOWMAR®, Los Angeles, California 90039
All rights reserved
Printed in the United States of America
International Standard Book Number 0-8372-1905-1
Originally published in 1929 by D. Appleton & Co., which is
now Appleton-Century-Crofts, Educational Division, Meredith
Corporation
This book is one of the titles in
BEST IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE, SERIES IV
by Bowmar

Click to Enlarge

1901-1915, Imperial Valley, compiled by Mrs. Wiley M. Weaver, includes an article reprinted from the Los Angeles Tribune, December 15, 1912.  That article was printed on the back of the first edition of my book, "Harold Bell Wright's Books and Collectibles."



1901 -- IMPERIAL VALLEY -- 1915

[Foremost among the prominent citizens who have contributed largely in the upbuilding of the Imperial Valley is Harold Bell Wright, the well-known author and writer.  Mr. Wright has been a resident of the Valley from its early beginning, spending his winters on a beautiful ranch near Holtville.  It was in the Imperial Valley that he laid the scenes for one of his most successful novels, "The Winning of Barbara Worth," and the mural decorations in the elegant new Barbara Worth Hotel at El Centro, just completed at a cost of $250,000 illustrate incidents in the lives of the characters so graphically presented.  Mr. Wright's optimistic views are set forth in the following article published in the Los Angeles Tribune, December 15, 1912.

IMPERIAL VALLEY IS
BY HAROLD BELL WRIGHT

The Imperial Valley is.  The time when we were not lies within the memory of the eighth grade.  The Colorado desert was here, but Imperial Valley had place only in the minds of a few optimistic promoters, imaginative engineers and hopeful adventurers.
     To the dwellers outside, we have been a topic for light conversation.  We have, to those who did not know, grown most luxuriantly in the promoters' pamphlets and in the real estate circulars.  We have belonged, in the minds of the real world, to that hearsay world where facts and fancies are so blended that the true seems false and the false seems true.  But today Imperial Valley is.
     Our principal crops are not now grown upon the fertile pages of the promoters' literature, but in the fields to which the farmers hold their tardy patents.  Alfalfa, corn, cotton, horses, hogs, and cattle are facts.  The Imperial Farm is.
     The non-producing speculator, the poaching land grabber, the get-rich-quick farmer of the farmers, are going the way of the disappearing coyote, the vanishing fox and the dying rabbit.  Against these noxious parasites that seek always to fatten upon new lands, and against all their thieving kin, our fields are being fenced.  The Imperial Farmer is.
     Commercial tramps, financial vagabonds, shifty peddlers of hot air, are fast taking the road that leads out.  The gates are being closed.  the opportunities now offered to capital are the opportunities of the woodpile.  The days of the easy handout are no more.  Imperial Business is.
    
No longer does the sweating pioneer, swinging to the Johnson bar of his Fresno, keep alive his courage with conjured visions of smooth lawns and well-kept fields, of rose hedges and flowers, of gardens, groves and orchards.  No more does the tired settler, when the night has come, dream of substantial houses and barns, of full granaries, of bountiful tables and comfortable beds.  The rude tent-house, the arrow-weed ramada, the rough board shack, the fire and bed under the mesquite, and the shelterless camp on the desert sands have passed into the keeping of the historian and novelist.  The Imperial Home is.
    
The hardy, dust-grimed, mud-caked, sunburned reclaimer of the desert no longer makes his lonely fire and with his own rude hand prepares the bacon, frijoles, flapjacks, and coffee for his solitary meal.  No more does his hungry heart know only the companionship of his team and the fellowship of his dog.  He need not now plod those weary miles to the uncertain postoffice, craving news from the dear ones who wait somewhere beyond the rim of the barren plain.  The Imperial Woman, Wife, and Mother is.
    
The folk who have made this land have as truly been made by the land.  Into the spirit of those who have wrought this work of reclamation, the spirit of the desert they have conquered has entered deeply.  The process of nature that laid bare the bottom of the sea and through the long centuries created the desert was a sifting process that has permitted only the fit to survive.  That the Imperial Valley is, evidences to the thinking world the character of the Imperial People.  The Imperial Citizen is.
    
To the home-hungry settler Imperial Valley has been a dream, a vision, a hope, a promise, a realization.  To the pioneer farmer it has been a work, a fight, a test, a hardship, a victory.  To the pioneer business man it has been a venture, a prospect, a risk, an opportunity, an investment.  To the people beyond our mountain walls it has been a gamble, a romance, an adventure, a joke.  But today Imperial Valley is.
    
This is the justification of every effort, the fulfillment of every promise, the reward of every struggle.  This is the answer to every criticism, the reply to every argument, the retort to every jeer, the rebuke to every sneer, the triumphant, unanswerable answer: Imperial Valley IS.

 

 

Your Questions and Suggestions are Welcome. Click here for Email Address.

This Harold Bell Wright web site is written and produced by Gerry Chudleigh with the help of many friends.
Copyright © 2000-May, 2011 by Gerry Chudleigh
Last updated 05/26/11