First
Editions

Search

What's New

Contents
Home

Site Map
Links
Value Guide
Copyright Info

Books
Printer

Shepherd
D.Matthews
Uncrowned
Barbara Worth

Yesterdays
Eyes of World
Man's a Man
Brian Kent
Helen
Mine
Son of Father
Groceryman
Long Ago Told
Exit
Devil's Hwy
Ma Cinderella
To My Sons
Went Away

Collectibles
Original Mat.
Excerpts
Plays
Pamphlets
--Compliments
--
As I know Him
--Intimate
--Life/Writings
--Inspired

--Sterling
Produce Labels

Sheet Music
BW  Hotel

ShepCountry
Other
Magazines

Photo Gallery
Paintings

Postcards
 
(List)
ADVERTISING
Appleton
BSC numbered
BSC no numb.

PRINTER

Aurora
SHEPHRD of HILLS
Area Photos
Boats, Docks
Branson RP
Branson tint
Hall Photo Co.
Marvel Cave
Matt's Cabn RP
Matt's Cabn tnt

Matt, Mollie, etc

Mutton,Dewey
Uncle Ike RP
Uncle Ike Tint
DAN MATTHEWS
Bennett Sp. Tint

Bennett Spr RP
Lebanon
BARB. WORTH
Hotel RP
Hotel Exterior
Hotel Inter

Hotel Scenic
Jacumba
San Diego

Santa Barbara

EYES

Forest Home
HBW PLACES
Hiram College
Imperial Cnty
Kansas City
Pierce City
Tucson


Movies
(Introduction)
1916, Eyes

1919, Shepherd
1924, Man
1924, Mine
1925, Son Father 
1925. Brian K
1926, Barb W
1928, Shepherd
(1928, Lights)
1930, Eyes
1935, When Man
1936,  Matthews
1936, The Mine
1936, Wild Brian
1937, West  Gold
1937, Out West
1937, Secret Vly
1937, Californian
1941, Shepherd
1949, Massacre
1959, Shep (TV)
1964, Shepherd

Locations
New York
Pierce City
Pittsburg
Kansas City
Lebanon
Branson
Redlands
El Centro
Tucson
Los Angeles
Escondido
San Diego

In Depth
Kinkead
Markham Review

Mike O'Brien
Tucson Library

UCLA Library

Princeton Library

Indiana U. Libr.

E Clampus Vitus
Bittersweet
Manuscripts

Sales

 


Dr. Joyce Kinkead on The Uncrowned King
Copyright 1979 by Joyce Kinkead.  Used by Permission.  

<<< co<<< continued from previous page.  

There, he is allowed to enter the Temple of Truth after he acknowledges that he has followed the Law and paid the Price, denial of Wealth of Traditions, Holy Prejudices, Sacred Opinion, Customs, Favors, and Honors of the World.[1]  While waiting in the Quiet Room, the Pilgrim hears the tale of the uncrowned king told in four parts.

            The first part, told by the Voice of the Waves, describes the setting and situation of the allegory.  In the Royal City Daybyday, located in the Land of Allthetime, the King What-Soever-Youthink lives with his twin sons, Really-Is and Seemsto-Be.  There are many religions and temples in the land; however, they do not receive equal attention since some temples are empty and others are crowded.  The sons see a glorious city in the distance and are granted permission to visit it.  Riding their horses, Reality and Appearance, they arrive in the City Sometime situated in the Land of Yettocome.  There, they wonder at the beauty of that city.

            The second segment, told by the Voice of the Evening Wind, concentrates on the boy's romancing of the king's daughters, Imagination and Fancy.  However, romance is cut short when the sons learn that their father has died.  The tale is picked up by the Voice of the Night as the tone grows somber.  Prince Seemsto-Be gets a head start on the rightful heir, Really-Is, and leaves him behind.  The plan eventually backfires though because the older prince stops at the house of Wisdom before traveling on.  There he learns the secret of the magic crown, which his father wore, and the correct road to travel to the kingdom.  His brother has taken the road, Chance, but the true heir takes the road, Opportunity.  From his visit with Wisdom, the prince learns that "The Crown is not the kingdom, nor is one King because he wears a crown" (King, p. 87).  When the true king secretly arrives in his kingdom, he patiently lives in a small house and worships daily, unknown to his brother.  In the meantime, the imposter king temps the people with holidays, feasts, and parades to keep them happy.

            However, in the fourth part told by the Voice of the New Day, the magic of the crown reveals itself, as it becomes tarnished and lusterless while sitting on the fake's head.  The other brother has developed a following because of his patience and devoted worship.  When the false king discovers his brother's presence in the city, he goes to him and asks him to rule the city with him.  The rightful king sadly refuses since the law declares that a hypocrite cannot reign.  The next day the brother is found dead at the temple where he worshipped the God, Things-Are-Good-Enough.  The rightful brother takes the throne, but the crown disintegrates since the brother has proven that a true king needs no symbol of his rank.  His personality is evidence of his royalty.  The king establishes one temple, and from then on, his people are happy worshipping their God, Things-That-Ought-To-Be.

            Though the allegorical names are rather ludicrous, the message of The Uncrowned King is clear:  there should be one church in which to worship one God.  The people go through phases of worship in the mythical kingdom.  Under the rule of the imposter, the people are entertained, much like the congregations are entertained in God and the Groceryman.  They soon tire of that approach and turn toward the rightful king who offers one church and simple worship.  The theme of God and the Groceryman, some seventeen years later, follows this allegory exactly but in an expanded, realistic version.

            Thus Wright focuses on two problems of the church in his novels about social gospel.  First, the hypocrisy of the church and its members is seen in each of these four books--That Printer of Udell's, The Calling of Dan Matthews, God and the Groceryman, and The Uncrowned King.  Although there are the seeds of antidenominationalism in Wright's first and second novels, that concept is not fully developed until the allegorical Christmas book and the 1927 novel.


Back to The Uncrowned King


    [1]Harold Bell Wright, The Uncrowned King (Chicago:  Book Supply, 1910), pp. 27-28.  Subsequent references to this book will be incorporated into the body of the text as King and pagination.

            Copyright 1979 by Joyce Kinkead.  Used by Permission.  

 

Your Questions and Suggestions are Welcome. Click here for Email Address.

This Harold Bell Wright web site is written and produced by Gerry Chudleigh with the help of many friends.
Copyright 2000-May, 2011 by Gerry Chudleigh
Last updated 05/26/11